Types of interviews

Job interviews are great opportunities for you to show to your potential employers what kind of employee you'll be if they hire you; your chances to have a successful interview will depend on the type of interview they hold. But it doesn't mean necessarily that your future will depend on it.

You must be prepared to whichever interview will present and knowledge will be your best weapon, you must include information on the industry, the employer and yourself; you might be wondering: who knows better than you? It's important to be aware on it.

Companies carry out different types of interviews upon the professional profile they require. This section will give you real and useful insights into each type of job interview. For instance, the stress interview section contains many useful details about how to create stressful environments in order to assess job seekers' emotional intelligence and problem solving skills. On the other hand, group interview test candidates on communication abilities. If you want to know more about the main types of interviews, we recommend you to browse through this section, and follow these pieces of advice on interviews.

Phone interview

Phone interview

Phone interviews are merely screening interviews meant to eliminate poorly qualified candidates so that only a few are left for personal interviews, it means that the employer must look for recruiting candidates for employment. The jobseeker's mission in this interview is to be invited for a personal face-to-face interview, to achieve this goal you must prepare just as you would for a regular face-to-face interview, and it's important to make some practices in order to record what you say and correct mistakes.

Face-to-face interview

Face-to-face interview

For a one-on-one interview, you had demonstrated previously that you have the skills and education necessary for the position. The interview will help employer to determine if you're a reliable source and if you will fit in with the company, and how your skills complement the rest of the company employees. In a one-on-one interview the jobseeker must keep eye contact with the interviewer to show interest and that he's not hiding something. It's also important to be careful with the body language at this part.

Group interview

Group interview

A group interview is usually designed to uncover the leadership potential of prospective managers and employees who will be dealing with the public that's why it includes several candidates that are questioned at once. It's naturally that in any group it stratifies into leaders and followers and that's how interviewer find out all candidates characteristics. The front-runner candidates are gathered together in an informal, discussion-type interview. A subject is introduced and the interviewer will start off the discussion. A group interview is generally used to see how the jobseeker interact with others and use him/her knowledge and reasoning powers to win others over.

Panel interview

Panel interview

Panel interviews are a common practice. For this interview you will have to face several members of the company who have a say in whether he/she is hired. In some committee interviews, you´ll have to demonstrate your problem-solving skills with some questions or case of study. The committee can outline a situation and ask you to formulate a plan that deals with the problem. The interviewers will look for how you can apply your knowledge and skills to a real-life situation related to the job you're applying.

Stress interview

Stress interview

Stress interviews are use to see how the jobseeker handles himself; it's not a nice way, but it helps to weed out candidates who cannot handle difficulties. The interviewer may be sarcastic or argumentative, or may keep him waiting or maybe he will ask questions so quickly that the potential employee won't have time to answer. Or maybe there will be lapse into silence at some point during the questioning, as a way to unnerve the jobseeker.

Informational interview

Informational interview

An informational interview is typically an interview set up when the jobseeker request with a Human Resources Manager or a departmental supervisor in the career field he/she is interested in. The purpose of this interview is to help the jobseeker find out more about a particular careers path, position or company. He/she is seeking information from these people in hopes that they might refer him/her to someone else in their company or to somebody they may know outside their company who could use those skills.

Online interview

Online interview

The online interview is maybe the first type of interview you'll have if you've been selected after the resumes have been scrutinized. At this step is when you have to effort to cause a good first impression, because the purpose of this meeting is to assess the skills and personality traits of the potential candidates. It takes many of the methodological issues in other traditional interviews, online interviews can be distinguished according to number of participants, but it's generally in one to one basis.

Behavioral interview

Behavioral interview

Although the format of a regular job interview and a behavioral interview don't differ greatly, the difference is in the questions that interviewer use to evaluate the candidate. The Interviewer won't only ask your questions, but also watching how you deal with situations of real life with other people; remember good manners and be persuasive. In this section we offer some examples of questions and situations you may face during the interview.